FAQs

Why should I adopt a pet from your organization when there are lots of other rescue groups?

answer

Our pets are healthy and socialized to family life. We make sure they are medically sound and ready for your companionship. Another important point is that we are one of the few "no kill" rescue groups in the area. Our adoption fees reflect the fact that Van Zandt County is mostly agrarian and the mean income is lower than many other areas.

   
question

I've heard that "strays" are not good animals. Why shouldn't I buy a dog or cat from a legitimate breeder?

answer

A conscientious and legitimate breeder has taken the time and spent the money to make sure the animals they breed are of top quality. Their prices reflect this. If you want a purebred, full blood animal with registration papers, be prepared to spend many hundreds of dollars. On the other hand, it has been our experience that mixed breed animals have calmer dispositions and fewer "trait problems" than any pure breed. Almost without exception, our foster animals have demonstrated affection, playfulness and loyalty to their new humans. We believe these are the hallmarks of a great family pet.

   
question

Since you are a no-kill organization, what happens when one of the animals in your care gets really sick?

answer

Our commitment is the health and welfare of the animal. Our fosters work in conjunction with our Medical Director to monitor the health of the animals. Vet care for our animals is routine. Prescribed treatments are monitored and depending on the treatment, the animal may be withheld from adoption until fully recovered. There are times, of course, when the animal's vet visit uncovers a very serious problem. In this case, if treatment won't help at any price, a decision is made based on vet recommendations, quality of life, pain and suffering. As a humane society, we recognize there are times when the kinder thing is to give the animal a dignified end. This is the only time we euthanize.

   
question

Where do your animals come from?

answer

Several places. Sometimes we are able to help people who call our hotline with a cat or dog who just "wandered up". Or someone found a mama dog and 6 pups and calls for help. In some cases, the authorities call on us to help in an abuse case, when the life of the animal is in danger. The local veterinarians also give our phone number to some of their clients who need assistance.

   
question

What are the benefits of spaying and neutering?

answer

It is widely believed that a female dog should not be spayed until she has a litter. Sometimes parents say, "I want my child to experience the birth of kittens." Or it isn't "manly" to have a male dog neutered. Rubbish! The female dog fares very well without ever having given birth, both medically and socially. If you want your child to be enlightened, take him to the local animal shelter to visit all the unwanted litters. And a neutered male dog is usually calmer than his intact counterparts. The incredible problem of pet overpopulation cannot be overemphasized. It is up to all of us to recognize this and to do the right thing.

   
question

How do I go about fostering for the VZCHS?

answer

Call our hotline number, 903/962-5700. We are always looking for safe and loving homes for our fostered animals. We will come to your home and assess the area, and also get a feeling for what you can accept. You will be asked to fill out a foster home form and we will build a pen at our cost. We also provide doghouses, bowls, food, and all medical care. In return, you will be asked to make sure the animals in your care are at our adoption clinics each Saturday. This is not a permanent commitment on your part, but we do ask that you think carefully before you decide. It isn't for everyone - sometimes the fosters get so attached to their animals they can't bear to give them up! But if you feel this is something you would like to do, please call.

   
question

I am thinking about adopting a rescue animal, how do I know which animal is right for me?

answer

Choose the right pet for you home, dogs and cats are not right for every household. There are problems such as allergies, apartment restrictions or moving issues that should be discovered before adopting a new pet. Large dogs may be too strong or active for small children. Small pets may be too delicate for children. Once you find a dog or cat that's right for you, obedience train your dog, and make an effort to really understand cat behavior. Basic training helps you communicate better with your pets and strengthens the human-animals bond.

Find Us

  • facebook
    email
    YouTube

Donate